Crawley scout receives two top scouting awards

Tim Taylor, the Deputy County Commissioner for Scouting in West Sussex came to Ifield Scout headquarters to present both the Duke of Edinburgh's Gold Award and the Queen's Scout Award to Jamie Keeley, from Furnace Green, who has become a Queen's Scout, the highest training award in the Scout Movement - picture submitted

Tim Taylor, the Deputy County Commissioner for Scouting in West Sussex came to Ifield Scout headquarters to present both the Duke of Edinburgh's Gold Award and the Queen's Scout Award to Jamie Keeley, from Furnace Green, who has become a Queen's Scout, the highest training award in the Scout Movement - picture submitted

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A Crawley student has picked up two Royal accolades for his scouting achievement receiving both the Queen’s Award and his Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award.

Queen’s Scout Jamie Keeley, 18, from Furnace Green, now holds the highest training award in the Scout Movement, which is only achieved by those showing the highest possible level of commitment and self discipline.

Tim Taylor, the deputy county commissioner for Scouting in West Sussex came to Ifield Scout headquarters earlier this month to make the double presentation.

Jamie was supported throughout his achievements by Andrew Eastman, Explorer Scout leader, who looks after the 14 to 18-year old group.

He said: “It gives me great sense of achievement every time one of my scouts achieves the top award of the Queen’s Scout.

“I’m proud of Jamie for progressing to this level.”

In arriving at this Jamie has progressed through the Scout movement from the age of six and taken part in challenges all over Britain and Europe.

He was a member of Drake Explorer Scout Unit meeting in Ifield up to the age of 18 when he transferred to Crawley Scout Network.

He did his Duke of Edinburgh expedition with other members of Drake Explorer Scout Unit hiking across mid Wales.

He has travelled to Ireland, Sweden and Norway for international expeditions with the Explorer Scouts as well as numerous camps across the UK.

This included spending a week on a National Trust project in Devon and training in kayaking starting at Tilgate Lake and progressed to lakes in Ireland and Sweden.

Volunteer work is also an important part of the Duke of Edinburgh Award. Jamie chose to work in hotels where he developed cooking skills.

He also spent four years volunteering at 2nd Ifield Scout Group helping lead both Cub Scouts and Scouts.

The Queen’s Scout Award is the highest honour in Scouting and is awarded for outstanding personal achievement.

This honour is only achieved by those showing the highest possible level of personal commitment, with holders having demonstrated extremely high standards of self-discipline and achievement in community service, activities and interests.

Self-reliance and personal initiative are also key aspects of the award.

All participants are aged between 16 and 25 from the two senior Scout sections; Explorers for 14 to 18-year-olds and Network for 18-25 year olds.

For more information about Crawley groups go to crawleydistrictscouts.co.uk