Crawley heads won’t publish full GCSE statistics

reks20140203b  St Wil;fred School, Old Horsham Rd Crawley. Michael Ferry is the new head teacher. Seen here in i.t. suite, Art Dept, in the corridor and outside. SUS-150518-170504001
reks20140203b St Wil;fred School, Old Horsham Rd Crawley. Michael Ferry is the new head teacher. Seen here in i.t. suite, Art Dept, in the corridor and outside. SUS-150518-170504001

Schools in Crawley have not released their full GCSE statistics due to the “confusing” new results system.

A joint statement issued by Hazelwick, Holy Trinity, St Wilfrid’s, Oriel, Thomas Bennett and Ifield Community College said: “The headteachers locally have agreed to share the successes of students rather than statistics as the new GCSEs have no clear ‘headline’ measure.

“We do not wish to confuse parents when there are two systems of grading in operation and the key measures are unclear.

“The Department for Education will produce earlier comparative statistics for us this year.”

English and maths GCSE papers are now graded on a scale of 9 to 1, with 9 being the highest, rather than A*-G. Other subjects will be phased into the new system every year until 2020.

Grades 9, 8 and 7 correspond with the old A*/A grades, so fewer students will receive the top mark. A pass mark, which used to be a C, is now a 4 or a 5 - 4 being a standard pass and 5 being a good pass.

It is these two gradings that have caused concern among headteachers.

While the students only need to earn a grade 4 to progress onto sixth-form or college, schools will be judged on the number who achieve grade 5 or better.

Michael Ferry, head of St Wilfrid’s School, Southgate, said: “It’s a confusing picture anyway for people inside education, never mind those outside.

“The problem we’ve got now is students will be judged on 4s but schools will be judged on 5s and you have a disparity between the two.

“That’s where the tension is.

“We’re trying to be transparent but there is a danger that, as schools, if we put out 5s and 4s and 9s and 8s it will just be a really confusing picture.

“The biggest mark of how well a school’s doing is the Progress 8 data but that’s not going to be available until some weeks’ time, and that will be produced by the DfE.”

Progress 8 measures the progress made by each child during their time in secondary school, compared to their ability at the end of primary school.

Mr Ferry added: “Education should not be a competition. The best thing for education in Crawley is when every single school is doing well.

“It should be about us being collectively supportive of each other to try and make sure that every child in Crawley gets the best possible education which leads them on to the next part of their life.”