Hope for little Verity whose heart could stop at any time

Verity Davy has a tumour that could stop her heart at any time
Verity Davy has a tumour that could stop her heart at any time

Two-year-old Verity’s heart might stop beating at any moment.

“We never know if today will be the day we might lose her.”

Verity with her parents Emily and Russell

Verity with her parents Emily and Russell

Emily and Russel Davy’s blissful family life in Gossops Green was turned into a ‘nightmare’ in January when their little daughter Verity was rushed to hospital.

Worried mother Emily, 32, said: “You could see her heart beating out of her body.”

Doctors found her heart was beating more than 250 times a minute – so fast the machines could not pick it up.

Medical staff managed to slow it down, but an MRI scan revealed the worrying truth.

The tumour makes her heart beat irregularly and could cause it suddenly stop at any time

Emily Davy

Verity has an extremely rare heart tumour called a fibroma.

Emily, who works for Virgin Atlantic at Manor Royal, said: “It has been a nightmare for me and my husband Russell.

“The tumour makes her heart beat irregularly and could cause it suddenly stop at any time.

“We never know if today will be the day we might lose her.”

For Emily and gas engineer Russell, all of this came out of the blue.

Now they have had to pull her out of the nursery she adored and carry a defibrillator everywhere in case her heart stops.

She added: “She’s such a sociable little girl, an absolute treasure.

“If you look at her you would think she’s just a normal two-year-old, but she’s got this heart condition that could kill her at any time.”

However, there is hope for Verity. The only problem is it is more than 3000 miles away.

Doctors in Boston in the USA believe they can remove Verity’s tumour and get her heart beating at a normal rate.

The NHS is unable to offer the surgery, Emily said, because it has not seen enough cases.

But the team in Boston has been performing the surgery for many years.

Their extensive experience has helped them achieve a 100 per cent survival rate over the last ten years.

Emily said: “It was amazing to see that they could do it.”

But the cost of the surgery and travel is very high, so the family have been forced to turn to crowdfunding to pay for the life-saving trip.

A donation page with a target of £100,000 has been set up, click here to visit it.