Covid deaths since Freedom Day: How Crawley, Horsham and Mid Sussex compare to worst-hit area in UK

There have been nearly 6,000 deaths in England since the country eased coronavirus lockdown restrictions on 19 July.

Tuesday, 28th September 2021, 2:20 pm

The latest UK Government figures show there have been 5,892 deaths in England since the country reopened a rate of 10.4 per 100,000 people.

The worst-affected area is Sunderland, which recorded 2.7 times as many deaths as the England average, as a proportion of the population.

But how do our areas compare?

The latest UK Government figures show there have been 5,892 deaths in England since the country reopened on 19 July, a rate of 10.4 per 100,000 people.

Mid Sussex

Mid Sussex ranks 219th in the UK for highest rate of deaths, 188th for greatest number of deaths and 23rd for highest rate of deaths in the South East.. There have been 10 deaths at a rate of 6.6 per 100,000 of the population (152,142) since July 19.

Crawley

Crawley ranks 229th in the UK for highest rate of deaths, 234th for greatest number of deaths and 35th for highest rate of deaths in the South East. There have been 7 deaths at a rate of 6.2 per 100,000 of the population (112,474) since July 19.

Horsham

Horsham ranks 278th in the UK, for highest rate of deaths, 250th for greatest number of deaths and 26th for highest rate of death in the South East.. There have been 6 deaths at a rate of 4.1 per 100,000 of the population (145,474) since July 19.

In the South East, the Isle Wight was the worst hit area, with a rate of 12.6 per 100,000 people.

In Sussex, Hastings was the worst hit area with a rate of 10.8 per 100,000.

Read More

Read More
Covid cases in Crawley increase by 139, official figures show

IPPR research fellow, Dr Parth Patel said: “It isn’t right, and yet it is no surprise, that these figures show Covid-19 deaths have fallen disproportionately on the north of England.

“We know that differences in the conditions in which people live and work determine your risk of catching Covid-19. After over a decade of Westminster’s austerity that has disproportionately affected regions like the North, including by cutting their public health budgets.

“It couldn’t be more urgent as we enter what is going to be a very tough winter. Covid-19 will continue to affect northerners disproportionately if rhetoric to ‘level up’ is not urgently matched with bolder policy.”

A government spokesperson said: “Any death is a tragedy and we know COVID-19 had a disproportionate impact on certain groups which is why Public Health England carried out a rapid review to better understand the relationship between this virus and factors like ethnicity, obesity and deprivation.

“The phenomenal vaccine rollout has built a wall of defence across the country, with over 123,100 lives saved and more than 230,000 hospitalisations prevented.

“The new Office for Health Improvement and Disparities will lead national efforts to improve and level up the health of the nation by tackling obesity, improving mental health and promoting physical activity."